Skin Care

Skin Care

Kallal Medical Group offers extensive skin care solutions for their patients which includes Acne care, removal of Skin Tags, Moles, Warts and Lesions and the surgical treatment of Vericose Veins.

What is Acne?

Acne is the term for plugged pores (blackheads and whiteheads), pimples, and even deeper lumps (cysts or nodules) that occur on the face, neck, chest, back, shoulders and even the upper arms. Acne affects most teenagers to some extent. However, the disease is not restricted to any age group; adults in their 20s – even into their 40s – can get acne. While not a life threatening condition, acne can be upsetting and disfiguring. When severe, acne can lead to serious and permanent scarring. Even less severe cases can lead to scarring.

Who gets acne?

Close to 100% of people between the ages of twelve and seventeen have at least an occasional whitehead, blackhead or pimple, regardless of race or ethnicity. Many of these young people are able to manage their acne with over-the-counter (nonprescription) treatments. For some, however, acne is more serious. In fact, by their mid-teens, more than 40% of adolescents have acne severe enough to require some treatment by a physician.

In most cases, acne starts between the ages of ten and thirteen and usually lasts for five to ten years. It normally goes away on its own sometime in the early twenties. However, acne can persist into the late twenties or thirties or even beyond. Some people get acne for the first time as adults.

Acne affects young men and young women about equally, but there are differences. Young men are more likely than young women to have more severe, longer lasting forms of acne. Despite this fact, young men are less likely than young women to visit a dermatologist for their acne. In contrast, young women are more likely to have intermittent acne due to hormonal changes associated with their menstrual cycle and acne caused by cosmetics. These kinds of acne may afflict young women well into adulthood.

Acne lesions are most common on the face, but they can also occur on the neck, chest, back, shoulders, scalp, and upper arms and legs

Acne Treatment

Today, virtually every case of acne can be resolved. The key to getting rid of acne lesions and preventing new ones from forming lies in knowing that:
• Resolution takes time.
• What works for one person may not work for another.
• A dermatologist’s help may be required.

Resolution takes time. Treatments that promise “fast,” miraculous” or “overnight” results often capture the attention of acne sufferers hoping for quick resolution. However, the fact remains that acne does not clear overnight. On average, 6 to 8 weeks are needed to see initial results. Once acne significantly improves or clears, continued treatment is needed to keep acne from re-appearing. If acne does not improve in 6 to 8 weeks, treatment may need to be adjusted as not every acne treatment clears every case of acne.

What works for one person may not work for another. What is an appropriate treatment for one person may not clear another’s acne because many factors affect resolution, including the cause(s) of the acne, a person’s skin type and the kind of acne lesions present.

With so many factors affecting clearance and a multitude of treatment options available (some only by prescription), a doctor’s help can make a difference. Before prescribing treatment, we consider several factors, including the severity of the acne, types of lesions present, co-existing conditions, as well as the patient’s age, skin type, lifestyle and motivation.

The knowledge gained from considering these factors allows us to create effective individualized therapy that will resolve the patient’s acne over time and prevent new lesions from forming.

Sometimes we may combine two or more treatment options. A patient may be instructed to use one medication in the morning and the other at night. Or, two medications may be combined in one prescription medication. Due to possible side effects, over-the-counter medications should not be combined unless directed by a dermatologist or other medical practitioner.

Acne responds especially well to early treatment. Dermatologists recommend that acne be treated early to maximize effectiveness as well as help prevent scarring

Removals of Skin Tags, Moles, Warts, and Lesions

Benign lesions, such as moles, skin tags and warts are easily removed and treated right here in the office. These lesions are usually more of a nuisance to a patient than anything, and can affect all age groups.

LESIONS

Moles tend to develop over time and increase in number with age. Sometimes moles grow in areas that become irritated. Moles are removed through procedures such as shaving or excisions after local anesthesia to the area. Mole removal is performed in an aesthetically precise fashion to assure the best result. Some moles are very deep in the skin and require an excision with sutures.

SKIN TAGS

Skin tags tend to occur in areas under higher friction, such as around the neck, in the armpits, or in the groin. They are benign, but in many cases, become very irritating and painful to the patient. Skin tags are removed by snip excision, freezing (cryotherapy) or electrocautery with very little recovery time.

WARTS

Warts are growths on your skin caused by a viral infection. Types of warts include:

  • Common warts, which often appear on your fingers
  • Plantar warts, which show up on the soles of your feet
  • Genital warts, which are a sexually transmitted disease
  • Flat warts, which appear in places you shave frequently

In children, warts often go away on their own. In adults, they tend to stay. If they hurt or bother you, or if they multiply, you can remove them. Chemical skin treatments usually work. If not the warts can be frozen with cryotherapy.

Varicose veins usually announce themselves as bulging, bluish cords running just beneath the surface of your skin. They almost always affect legs and feet. Visible swollen and twisted veins — sometimes surrounded by patches of flooded capillaries known as spider veins — are considered superficial varicose veins. Although they can be painful and disfiguring, they are usually harmless. When inflamed, they become tender to the touch and can hinder circulation to the point of causing swollen ankles, itchy skin, and aching in the affected limb.

Besides a surface network of veins, your legs have an interior, or deep, venous network. On rare occasions, an interior leg vein becomes varicose. Such deep varicose veins are usually not visible, but they can cause swelling or aching throughout the leg and may be sites where blood clots can form.

Varicose veins are a relatively common condition, and for many people they are a family trait. Women are at least twice as likely as men to develop them. In the U.S. alone, they affect about 23% of all Americans.

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