Preventative Medicine

Preventative Medicine

Preventive Medicine is the specialty of medical practice that focuses on the health of individuals, communities, and defined populations.

Its goal is to protect, promote, and maintain health and well-being and to prevent disease, disability, and death.

Physicals: Complete Physicals; School/Athletic Physicals

Routine physicals

Routine physicals are physical examinations performed on asymptomatic patients for medical screening purposes and usually include laboratory tests. Other services may include chest x-rays, pulmonary function testing, audiograms, full body CAT scanning, EKGs, heart stress tests, vascular age tests, urinalysis, and mammograms or prostate exams depending on gender.

School/Athletic Physicals

Most school athletics programs require physical exams and doctors’ permission to participate in certain activities. These exams usually include vision and hearing tests. It is important to bring any required paperwork from the school to your exam.

We also offer DOT and FAA physicals

 

Women’s Wellness Exams

 

Having a wellness or yearly health care visit is a great opportunity to take charge of your health. Routine health care visits can help find problems early or prevent health problems before they occur. If problems are found early, they may be easier to treat and less likely to pose serious risks to your health. Preventive or Wellness health care includes the following:

  • Discussion of health topics relevant to your age and risk factors
  • Exams
  • Discussion regarding screening tests and immunizations (however, these may not be covered by your insurance carrier)

Gynecology is health care for the female body, focusing on the sexual and reproductive organs. Proper gynecological care helps prevent many undesired cancers, diseases and other illnesses by allowing for early detection. Early detection is essential for effective preventative measures and treatment.

Regardless of your age, marital status, sexuality or level of sexual activity, gynecological care is important. Listen to your body when it signals that something may be wrong. Don’t hesitate to approach a health care professional with any questions regarding your body or changes it might be going through. It is important to choose a doctor you’d be comfortable speaking with confidentially and asking questions of a personal nature that might be of concern to you.

Women should have a gynecological exam at least once every year when they turn 18 years old, or when they start being sexually active.

You may need to have checkups even more often if you have (1):

  • Plans to become pregnant
  • A sexually transmitted disease (STD) or a sex partner with an STD
  • A history of sexual health problems
  • A sexually-related illness
  • A mother or sister who developed breast cancer before menopause
  • A history of abnormal Pap test results
  • A breast lump

Additionally, women and girls of any age need to visit their gynecologist if they notice irregularities in their breasts, genitalia, menstrual cycles, or if they become pregnant. You should consult your clinician if you have any of the following symptoms (2):

  • Unusual vaginal or pelvic pain
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge
  • Severe pelvic or lower abdominal pain
  • Pain, swelling, or tenderness of the vulva or vagina
  • Sores, lumps, or itching of the vulva or vagina
  • Growths or thickening of the breast or armpit
  • Puckering, dimpling, or other changes in the skin of the breast
  • Newly retracted nipples or bleeding or discharge from the nipple
  • Changes in size or shape of the breast
  • Increased pain or discomfort before your period
Having a wellness or yearly health care visit is a great opportunity to take charge of your health. Routine health care visits can help find problems early or prevent health problems before they occur. If problems are found early, they may be easier to treat and less likely to pose serious risks to your health. Preventive or Wellness health care includes the following:
  • Discussion of health topics relevant to your age and risk factors
  • Exams
  • Discussion regarding screening tests and immunizations (however, these may not be covered by your insurance carrier)

Gynecology is health care for the female body, focusing on the sexual and reproductive organs. Proper gynecological care helps prevent many undesired cancers, diseases and other illnesses by allowing for early detection. Early detection is essential for effective preventative measures and treatment.

Regardless of your age, marital status, sexuality or level of sexual activity, gynecological care is important. Listen to your body when it signals that something may be wrong. Don’t hesitate to approach a health care professional with any questions regarding your body or changes it might be going through. It is important to choose a doctor you’d be comfortable speaking with confidentially and asking questions of a personal nature that might be of concern to you.

Women should start seeing their gynecologist at least once every year when they turn 18 years old, or when they start being sexually active.

You may need to have checkups even more often if you have (1):

  • Plans to become pregnant
  • A sexually transmitted disease (STD) or a sex partner with an STD
  • A history of sexual health problems
  • A sexually-related illness
  • A mother or sister who developed breast cancer before menopause
  • A history of abnormal Pap test results
  • A breast lump

Additionally, women and girls of any age need to visit their gynecologist if they notice irregularities in their breasts, genitalia, menstrual cycles, or if they become pregnant. You should consult your clinician if you have any of the following symptoms (2):

  • Unusual vaginal or pelvic pain
  • Abnormal vaginal bleeding or discharge
  • Severe pelvic or lower abdominal pain
  • Pain, swelling, or tenderness of the vulva or vagina
  • Sores, lumps, or itching of the vulva or vagina
  • Growths or thickening of the breast or armpit
  • Puckering, dimpling, or other changes in the skin of the breast
  • Newly retracted nipples or bleeding or discharge from the nipple
  • Changes in size or shape of the breast
  • Increased pain or discomfort before your period

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